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8 Steps toward Quality Care for Northern Indigenous Youth

What does good, non-stigmatized sexual healthcare look like for northern and indigenous youth? This question has become very important to me.

I have had the great privilege of discussing this question at length with youth across the Northwest Territories, the Yukon and Nunavut as a program facilitator for FOXY (Fostering Open eXpression among Youth), an arts based sexual health program that was awarded the 2014 Arctic Inspiration Prize and has taken the north by storm with its revolutionary approach to talking with youth about sexual health, sexuality, and relationships.

The following eight answers are woven from an amalgamation of candid, opened, group discussions with northern and indigenous teens.

  1. Tell them you’re glad they are there

One of the most powerful things you can do to encourage youth to access healthcare, to ensure a positive experience, and to help them spread the word to others, is to welcome them and congratulate them on taking steps to care for themselves. For many, and especially for youth, feeling unwelcomed, or even being treated with neutrality, can be detrimentally off-putting. A warm welcome and a high five for being there really goes a long way.

  1. Confidentiality

When you live in a small town, it can help a lot to be assured that your relationship with your healthcare provider is confidential. Of course, be honest about any restrictions that apply, especially when caring for youth, but confidentiality is so important when it comes to sexual and reproductive health and reminding people that their information is safe is an excellent step to a successful visit.

  1. Be accessible

In the north, healthcare is not always accessible, so you need to be as accessible as possible. This may be the first time, or the first time in a long time that someone has chosen to or been able to access your services – be thorough.

  1. Listen

The number one beef teens have with healthcare providers is that they don’t listen! Whether we don’t think they can understand, or just think they don’t know how to make good decisions, not listening to them is a sure way to shut them down and put up a barrier that will be more difficult to overcome the next time they need to access the healthcare system. After all, they are the experts on themselves and I promise we are much more likely to underestimate them than we are to overestimate them.

  1. Honour language barriers

Recognizing that many northern indigenous youth do not speak English as a first language is important. It is equally as important to balance that knowledge with the reminder that having English as a second language does not denote intelligence or ability to comprehend a concept. People can understand if you can put things the right way.

  1. Don’t assume gender or sexuality

Heteronormativity is a major deterrent for our LGBTQ2+ youth in accessing healthcare. By not assuming a patient’s gender or sexuality you are helping to overcome stigmatization and ultimately provide superior, more thorough care.

  1. Be trauma and violence informed

There is a push in medical circles in Canada right now to become more trauma and violence informed. This can help to provide very crucial services to a wide demographic in a way that will maximize receptiveness and efficacy. There is much that can be done in recognizing violence and trauma and knowing how to shape medical visits when you are working with a patient who is dealing with such experiences.

  1. Set them up for next time

You don’t know who will be providing their care next visit. Remind them not to give up if their next experience is less than ideal and that a second opinion is available, and a responsible option if they don’t feel they receive the care they need.

We all contribute to the legacy of our time, and I do hope that we are moving towards better services for all, including our northern and indigenous youth residing in small, outlying communities. These eight steps can take practice to become second nature, but are worth the extra effort. When we remind them that they are worth it, they remind us right back.

 

 

 

 

 

 

SRH Week 2017 is just around the corner!

This year, Sexual and Reproductive Health Awareness Week (SRH Week) will take place from February 12-18 with the theme: Ready for some pillow talk?

The 2017 campaign will build on last year’s “What’s Your Relationship Status” campaign by asking health care providers and clients/patients to “start the conversation” for the best possible care.

Open communication between health care providers and clients/patients is crucial to sexual and reproductive health.

On February 12th, we’ll be launching a quick reference book for health care providers and a blog series spotlighting health care providers making a real difference. We’ll be on Facebook and Twitter too! Find us @srhweek or download our social media kit (coming soon!).

The new campaign and material will be available on www.srhweek.ca as of February 12. Can’t wait until then? Check out campaign material from last year!
Of course, any campaign needs strong voices to really make a difference. Help promote sexual and reproductive health this SRH Week by displaying the posters, following @SRHweek on Twitter and Facebook, visiting www.srhweek.ca and helping to spread the word!

Want posters? No problem! If you would like to order copies of the poster, click here and fill out the poster order form. We’ll be happy to send you posters at no charge. For campaign graphics, social media tools, PDF copies of the poster and much more keep visiting www.srhweek.ca!

Now let’s start the conversation!